Day 18

Language! If everything is a constructed signifier, then there is always the possibility of maleability...deconstruction theory and postmodern strategies that decenter absolutes and identity...think Cixous's Escriture Feminine "Sorties"

"Word Worlds" in Architectures p. 153+, and the idea that language can be a protagonist in your stories (description can take on a life of it's own that isn't about transparency--the use of concrete language does this, but metaphorical language can do this even more)...

Showing vs. Telling...p. 156 Show don't tell (use concrete, descriptive language; but you also need to tell or use exposition sometimes), and the Coover example...what seems fresh? What seems old?

...And Barthes' p. 38 ideas about bourgioesie stereotypes vs. language that wounds and seduces (both, because mere seduction might be trying too hard, and wounding means discomfort or anti-expectation)...

 

The text that is bourgioesie is The Fast and Furious or Transformers; Also the new comedy Alpha House--assumes the audience is dumb with it's onesy twosy, on the nose dialogue that sets up simplistic political characterization...audiences are far more sophisticated now that they've seen tragicomic and dramady shows like House of Lies, Nurse Jackie, Girls, Veep...

...vs. Amelie where each phrase seduces and wounds, each word/idea is seemingly new or at least unexpected (and magically real--suicidal fish, for instance)...

Children and Young Adult award winners: Three Times Lucky; Seraphina;

 

Gertrude Stein and language (not just the bliss of Tender Buttons): Modernism and Stein's Three Lives and Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway (the flattening and spreading of faces and time and action, like with Picasso and Duchamp, with a perverse attention to language and rhythm)...

 

 

 

Pleasure of the Text p. 10: Barthes discusses tmesis, the perverse word expansion/neologism technique...

 

 

new criticism and craft comments as a reading style

 

--The &Now: Pelton p. 221+; Becker p. 224+