4420 Day 13
Workshop stories?
Coming up Twilight Zone 2 part exercise with a focus on plot

Nick Lake’s In Darkness YA Novel, yet certainly interesting for adults…
Young Adult Fiction and Nick Lake’s In Darkness: A non-clichéd novel about two protagonists who live in extreme poverty and violence

 

Thinking about Affective Stylistics as a workshop commenting strategy, and expectations fulfilled or violated with each word or sentence in a story...
Subtext in dialogue

Character in dialogue

Winterson: also does revisionist history; has magic and metaphors, and the poetic voice (vs. the poetry of Beloved, a postmodern ghost story with much more density than Winterson, and less dearness; fewer aphorisms about living); the lack of black and white protagonists vs. antagonists which is common with postmodern writing that defies realism and especially Hollywood genres...

Character based work is more interesting than plot-based work according to many experts like John Truby (plot based three act restorative structures are central to action films and romance films)...so knowing your character well is important when you start writing a literary novel...


 

...and Gould's Book of Fish--uncanny or marvelous? What's novelistic about both? Large passages of time; larger themes like ontology and rebellion; revisionist history (even with that font from the 1700's, or this example, both being slave auction notices)
Structures: the three act restorative (common with those who discuss screenplays), and how it doesn't really work with postmodern novels; the Naked Playwriting event grid that also doesn't really work with postmodern novels--but we can learn from it...
One Hundred Years of Solitude: starts with a postmodern geneology chart which suggests multiple generations and a longer spanse of time; the first chapter has many time shifts, some hinting at "primordial eggs"...