Winterson! Dialogue, character, setting, exposition, details, metaphors, metafiction, and magical realism--p. 82 starts talking about the Heart metaphorically, and literally;

Todorov's The Fantastic or the uncanny vs the marvelous (Elements of prose/fiction (vocabulary):

 

John Truby on caring about characters, and writing plot out of character...

Prose/fiction vocabulary to know.

Writing a Novel by starting with an obsessive narrative, character, or concept and leading to an Outline of 12 possible chapters (put in everything, even if absurd)--here are a number of ideas...

Another approach to Novel Outlines from genre historical fiction writer K. M. Weiland in Outlining Your Novel: Map Your Way to Success: start with a time period or character you are obsessing over, then brainstorm "What If?" questions about that period/character/theme, writing down every idea "no matter how crazy" (p. 47, 49):

HowToWiki on Novel Writing--sample outline (follows a three act structure)

  1. Create a fictional world
    1. inspiration
    2. genre
    3. setting
    4. character
    5. plot
    6. POV
    7. or just start with a general idea
  2. Drafting the novel
    1. outline
    2. writing routine
    3. research (read other novels, and research your world's details)
    4. first draft
  3. Revising the novel
    1. write many drafts and incubate
    2. self-editing
    3. getting comments from others
    4. try to publish

 

Or maybe you need to go back to How to write a short story...? Some of these advice videos are better than others...here's one--Tina Maya's--that actually suggests you make your novel ready for its screenplay...really?! Why not just write a screenplay? She covers outlining in terms of Blake Schneider's "beat sheets" and Freytag and the Monomyth and other screenwriterly ideas (she also talks like these are her ideas--but these ideas have been around for a long time). So why not read a good book about structure instead? (See 8:50 if you want to see her 3 act, 15 point beat sheet...at one point she talks about "flushing" your outline, and I would agree...)