Baudrillard

Iconography takes the place of the divine in a “panic stricken” desire to still have access to the divine—instead of enhancing or producing aspects of the divine (Plato’s ideal) which never changes, the more iconography, the more the divine is murdered…
the death of the divine referential (or referent, or the death of the transcendental signified)…icons efface God/Truth, they don’t merely mask…
The icons replace the real
We live in the hyperreal, where everything is (re)production, and nothing is “real”…everything is produced, everything is simulation already…not even the “erasure” of “the real” exists…
Ethnography—when an anthropologist studies an ancient culture—say one that exists now, say in the Amazon—they are also at the same time destroying that culture…changing it…that change is problematic, which suggests the false idea that something pure can exist somewhere…some pure, untouched, Amazonian tribe/culture…
Capitalism—eclecticism the ultimate consumer—one is then the target audience for multiple products; is a postmodern text eclectic in that it consumes, and solicits, multiple texts/interpretations, multiple disturbances that need fulfilling yet will never be fulfilled (and thus consumerism is infinite)—pomo text resists/obliterates fulfillment, bars (cage) us from landing somewhere…
“the meaning is still there” even without the traditional scaffolding of literature
Heisenberg’s Uncertainly Principle—the observer changes what they are observing…you can’t see the atom if you know it’s speed…if you can see it (location) you can’t know it’s speed…

 

p. 635 –transcendental signified guarantee of meaning
DF--145—a weaker, paler version of the father