3450 Non-Lecture Notes Day 1

Web calendar is where you get daily readings and writing assignments including explanations, links, and deadlines.  The web calendar also has lecture notes and links in the grey column.  The Web calendar is essential for passing the class.


If you have questions, ask ME rather than some random person in class (unless they’ve had me before and done well). You can ask me after class, during class if it’s relevant, or in an email (not the Canvas messaging, though, since it’s hard to use).  mortenle@uvu.edu

 

Go to notes 2?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old

  1. Todorov’s The Fantastic: The Marvelous (magical realism—no one is surprised when strange things happen, and there are no logical explanations) vs. The Uncanny (where strange things happen, but there are logical explanations for them)
    1. One Hundred Years of Solitude ch. 12 p. 253—men who love Remedios drop like flies, but it could be random; p. 255—Remedios the beauty floats away where no memory birds even fly
  2. Minimalism—what does it inspire in my own writing?
    1. Viewfinder by Raymond Carver
  3. Be open to mixing genres:
    1. fiction, nonfiction, realism, magic, sci fi tech, fantasy, literary, Avant-garde
  4. How do you flesh the elements of your stories?
    1. Do journal exercises like 50 Questions for a character
      1. What is their relationship with their parent?  What do they imagine it is?  What is it really?
  5. Roland Barthes and Texts of Bliss (Prose Vocabulary)
  6. Some writers, and painters, deal with the same subjects all their lives (See Edward Hopper who said he only ever wanted to paint light on the side of a building); notice the narrative quality of his work too, though
  7. Journal 1--writerly Journal: the things that obsess us--the hidden/secret nerves in our writing; journal as a repository of future material or as a place to try things out?
  8. Voices, secret chambers, and Cisneros; truth vs. fiction ("Is it true? Yes. Did it happen?  No."); Toni Morrison's "Truth"
  9. Southern Grotesques and conflict.

Alternative Notes Lee Might Use:

  1. The Western (for a contest)?  Traditional like Louis Lamour or John Wayne?  Or more modern like Silverado?  Or postmodern like  The Quick and the Dead?  Brokeback Mountain (see another of Proulx's Wyoming Stories in Best 99).
  2.  

 Melanie Rae Thon image notebook of your own (pp. What If): "every day record at least one image...use all your senses...what's the most striking thing [you] heard, saw, smelled, touched, tasted today." Bring something to write in/on.

 

 

Old Notes:
Lee's Lecture Notes:
1. Roland Barthes and Texts of Bliss (Prose Vocabulary): Carol Maso's Ava, and an interview.
2. Some writers, and painters, deal with the same subjects all their lives (See Edward Hopper who said he only ever  wanted to paint light on the side of a building); notice the narrative quality of his work too, though
5. Scenes...
6. The Western (for a contest)?  Traditional like Louis Lamour or John Wayne?  Or more modern like Silverado?  Or postmodern like  The Quick and the Dead?  Brokeback Mountain (see another of Proulx's Wyoming Stories in Best 99).
7. F. Busch and writing advice: from Faulkner (don't write just charming things p. 7); from Steinbeck ("abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish...write just one page for each day" p. 7)
8. Voices, secret chambers, and Cisneros; truth vs. fiction ("Is it true? Yes. Did it happen?  No.")
Lorrie Moore on Why Reading is Vital (non-commercially mediated language)