3420 day 3

minimalism: Raymond Carver; Basho; Bass—often avoids adjectives and adverts, rejects metaphor
vs.  Bass? Dreams
maximalism: Toni Morison; David Foster Wallace; Annie Proulx—shifting POV, extreme description, poetic use of sound play; pieces with stronger voices from uber narrators or first person narrators

•             Description—concrete detail, or imagery: metaphor (without like or as), similes (less surreal than metaphor); pacing
•             Narration—the act of telling a story, or the act of describing action—pacing--plot
•             Exposition—backstory, philosophical/thematic work
•             Dramatized Scenes—slowest pacing?—dialogue, close description of action, emotion

 

  1. Bunchgrass audible 3:28:21
  2. Exercise #1 (apprenticing on form by trying something an author we've read has tried)
  3. Cisneros at 3:00? (in Canvas Files Video)

Truth vs. Fiction
intros—risky longish exposition of Bunchgrass
endings—the heavy closure of Bunchgrass
names—names seem highly unrealistically western like Waneta, Ottaline, yet also magical like Alladin and Flyby

discussed the perversity of “Truth” in Little Expressionless Animals

Stanley Fish’s Affective Stylistics: close reading of the text and of my reactions to expectations the text sets up (or that I have before coming to the text) and the way the text disappoints/changes or fulfills expectations

Review Tzvetan Todorov’s The Fantastic:

 

Day 3??
minimalism: Raymond Carver; Basho; Bass—often avoids adjectives and adverts, rejects metaphor
vs.  Bass? Dreams
maximalism: Toni Morison; David Foster Wallace; Annie Proulx—shifting POV, extreme description, poetic use of sound play; pieces with stronger voices from uber narrators or first person narrators

 

Lee's Lecture Notes Day 3: The So Called "Basics"?

  1. Proulx and her concrete description vs. narration vs. exposition vs. dramatized scenes...
  2. Exposition problems or "Plot Dumping" (I would call this narrative or descriptive dumping, or the problem of giving excessive backstory in dialogue, because I like to think of exposition as the more philosophical/thematic/argumentative part of the story); here's backstory advice for screenwriters (who often have a lot of dialogue that must flow)
  3. Thinking about Freytag's triangle--what is a story (traditionally, in the genre of realism)? Thinking about climax and closure (compare Bass, and Brown, Proulx).
  4. Texts of Pleasure and Bliss, and your guilty pleasure texts
  5. What kind of writer are you?

 

Alternative Lecture Notes Lee Might Get to:

  1. The spectrum of Maximalism (high exposition and poetic description) vs. Minimalism (very low exposition and poetic description); look at Carver's minimalist Popular Mechanics

 

 

 

 

Old Notes:

1. Elements of prose/fiction (vocabulary), and thinking about Todorov's the fantastic (T. Todorov):
the uncanny vs the marvelous; the uncanny is when supernatural things happen in a story that can then be explained by "natural" law (R. Bass); the marvelous is when supernatural things happen in a story without explanations, yet they give off the feel of being "normal" (G. Garcia Marquez?)
--I would link this to magical realism which Allende says "combines reality and surreality onto the same plane."
(compare Bass, and Brown, Proulx).

7. Introduce Bass and Brown (each story guided by a love cliché or metaphor
)

does Proulx use stereotypes? does this work?

6. Proulx--how does she get away with so much summary/exposition/description rather than dramatized scenes at the start of her story?. Proulx and her concrete description vs. exposition vs. dramatized scenes...

amazon reviews of wallace (and the anti-pomo girl, cosmoetica)

David Foster Wallace Reading (batons)

--Narration; description; exposition; dramatized scenes

4. The spectrum of Maximalism (high exposition and poetic description) vs. Minimalism (very low exposition and poetic description); look at Carver's minimalist Popular Mechanics

3. Thinking about Freytag's triangle--what is a story (traditionally, in the genre of realism)? Thinking about climax and closure