3420 day 2

Using What If? for journaling, for ideas when you don’t seem to have any.

p. 7 First Sentences—which one grabs you the most?  Which one has the most surprise?  Which one establishes plot?  Which establishes and interesting character or voice?  Which one establishes setting?

Why was she still here?  She looks at her watch, tries to drink her drink which has been empty for an hour.
The goats were gone, covered in sand or lies, she couldn’t tell which. He came home without them either way, and since he didn’t smell like perfume or the the butcher’s floor, she knew she would never find out what really happened…

It’s always rings that are magical.

The pills spilled out of the container and onto the floor where a blind dog was waiting to lick them up like beef jerky treats or cookies.  In an hour, the dog would be tongue out drooling, so of course she had to go to the vet.
Bass' painterly eye for detail: blueness, dogs, trout, women; his process explanation (heard a story about Grey Wolf)

 

Day 2 or 3?
minimalism: Raymond Carver; Basho; Bass—often avoids adjectives and adverts, rejects metaphor
vs.  Bass? Dreams
maximalism: Toni Morison; David Foster Wallace; Annie Proulx—shifting POV, extreme description, poetic use of sound play; pieces with stronger voices from uber narrators or first person narrators

 

Lee's Lecture Notes Day 2: Reading Fictional Aesthetics

Elements of prose/fiction (vocabulary), and thinking about Todorov's the Fantastic: the uncanny (can be explained), but the marvelous has no explanation, yet may feel normal--I would link this to magical realism which Allende says "combines reality and surreality onto the same plane."
Exposition, narration, description (poetic, minimal?), pacing (slows when there is more description and poetry), and dramatized scenes (and the pacing of all this).
Reading reactions as creative writers, and Outside Lecture/Reading Reactions as creative writers with a focus on craft, on style, on form, on cool moves (often the language of New Criticism); you can also use Tan's list, the prose vocabulary list, various Pomo Laundry list,
Reader Response theories: subjective reader response; affective stylistics
Bass' painterly eye for detail: blueness, dogs, trout, women; his process explanation (heard a story about Grey Wolf)

Brown's gothic romance mixed with contemporary machine and love language as well as violence (tre pomo); Amy Tan wants change, though, so would she go "Huh?" at this story?

 

 

Alternative Notes Lee Might Use:

Moral obligations in fiction? Propaganda?

Why do we write fiction? Abbot p. 16, Baxter p. 38, 39.

An author talks about the merging of "low" vs. "high" culture, and Monty Python.

What If p. 270 "Learning to Lie" (see my three)

 

 

 

Old Notes:

 

 

 

 

Lee's Lecture Notes Day 2: Reading Fictional Aesthetics

  1. Elements of prose/fiction (vocabulary), and thinking about Todorov's the Fantastic: the uncanny (can be explained), but the marvelous has no explanation, yet may feel normal--I would link this to magical realism which Allende says "combines reality and surreality onto the same plane."
  2. Exposition, narration, description (poetic, minimal?), pacing (slows when there is more description and poetry), and dramatized scenes (and the pacing of all this).
  3. Reading reactions as creative writers, and Outside Lecture/Reading Reactions as creative writers with a focus on craft, on style, on form, on cool moves (often the language of New Criticism); you can also use Tan's list, the prose vocabulary list, various Pomo Laundry list,
  4. Reader Response theories: subjective reader response; affective stylistics
  5. Bass' painterly eye for detail: blueness, dogs, trout, women;  his process explanation (heard a story about Grey Wolf)
  6. Brown's gothic romance mixed with contemporary machine and love language as well as violence (tre pomo); Amy Tan wants change, though, so would she go "Huh?" at this story?

Alternative Notes Lee Might Use:

  1. Moral obligations in fiction?  Propaganda?
  2. Why do we write fiction?  Abbot p. 16, Baxter p. 38, 39.
  3. An author talks about the merging of "low" vs. "high" culture, and Monty Python.
  4. What If p. 270 "Learning to Lie" (see my three)

 

 

Old Notes: