Day 2: The Seduction

  1. Roland Barthes--Texts of Bliss and cliched language; the text that disrupts vs. the text that comforts
  2. Introduce Sylvia Plath -- Lowell on Plath: p. vii--on her voice; the controlled hallucination; "Though lines get repeated, and sometimes the plot is lost, language never dies in her mouth."
  3. Some text of bliss characterization in Sedaris (the mother from "Ashes" talking about aborted fetuses)
  4. Some angry tones in Lorde's poem (see Metro)
  5. 8. Minimalism--Malevich's black square painting, and William Carlos Williams' "This is Just to Say"  (see Jan. 17)...a movement or form of art, poetry, fiction etc.  Duchamp's dada "Fountain"

     

    Ortiz-Taylor and Winifred's character details--what stands out? Are there complexities about her? Where is it 3rd limited through her eyes, and when do you notice an uber narrator? what about the first person POV? and what about the uber narrator on the third page who seems to be above it all? There's suddenly a voice taking over here...

    Plath's Metaphor poem is funny, yet it's also tragic and dark when you do some closer, more detailed connotative readings of the metaphors...i like that it's a riddle that tells you it's a riddle...there is a distinct persona (voice) in this piece too...and Plath obsesses with children, babies, and pregnancy...

    reminds me a Dali's strolling elephants...surreal, creepy, dark, funny

  6. 1. Bliss;
    2. New Criticism (close reading) vs. Biographical Criticism;
    2. Subjective Reader Response--memories and emotions the poem or story triggers from your life--can be a good way to start talking about a poem or story, but professors don't like you to focus only on your "personal" stories at the expense of the text
    3. Ortiz-Cofer and a blissy sense of POV (but is the ending too much a text of pleasure?)

    6. Introduce Sylvia Plath -- Lowell on Plath: p. vii--on her voice; the controlled hallucination; "Though lines get repeated, and sometimes the plot is lost, language never dies in her mouth."

    2. Ex. 1--Getting "real" in public (sharing ourselves and our juju boxes); do journal exercises from Metro p. 206 in class!  Calvino's "Combinatorial play" p. 206-207: we played with #1 and #6 in class...
    4. Joyce Carol Oates: writing about our forbidden passions.


    7. Robert Bly's Leaps (Metro p. 181; kind of like Breton's surrealist description of the "hypnagogic state").
    8. Writing with the senses, and other concrete detail work (getting low on the scale of abstraction)
    9. Metro pp. xxv: writing as transportation
    10. On Reading--Ostrom's poem p. 292; our personal cannon?

    Emily Dickinson's poem on Death (metaphors...but are there any similes?)

Alternative Notes Lee Might Use:

  1. Joyce Carol Oates: writing about our forbidden passions.
  2. Metro pp. xxv: writing as transportation
  3. On Reading--Ostrom's poem p. 292; our personal cannon?