College Writing 1, A Critical Thinking and Writing Course
by Professor Lee Ann Mortensen, MFA, at Utah Valley University

 

Lee's English 1010 Calendar, Spring 2019


 

Updated 3/14/19 10:43 PM - subject to change

 

  T TH T TH T TH T TH T ??
January 8 10 15 17 22 24 29 31    
February 5 7 12 14 19 21 26 28    
March 5 7 12 14 19 21 26 28    
April 2 4 9 11 16 18 23 25 30 Fri
May

2

7 9

15

 

       

Sorry, I can't make the small calendar above work right now, so just use the Find function, or scroll down and browse...

 Day

Calendar--Readings & Assignments Due before class!

Lecture Notes and Links

If you miss class, check here...

 

Jan. 8

Introduction: Authors are now Everywhere it seems...

Readings Due Before Class

  • Syllabus & Calendar
  • Purchase main texts--Everyone's an Author (ed. 2nd). Also available for ebook purchase/rental at CourseSmart or Amazon and available to rent). Your other book is Boys in the Boat (at Amazon in print and Kindle, and available for rent). See syllabus!
  • Learn how to use this Web Calendar for readings and assignment instructions. Learn how to use Canvas where you will turn in your work, get grades, and get announcements.

 

Assignments Due during Class:


Lecture Notes EA Day 1:

Fall 2018: What is power? Is it in the symbol of a huge, towering building in New York (a phallic symbol according to Freud)? Is it in a suit? A shoe? In the way we speak? Or in the very fact that we speak out?

 

Previous semester--Let's try tumblr, some links to topic ideas, discussion communities, current affairs--last semester it was the Confederate Monuments. What's current now?

We can look at news and articles about Confederate Monuments (but also look at this ABC News link of the violent neo-nazi protests). What is being authored in any of these "texts"? What about Aristotle's idea of Rhetoric (rhetoric is the art of coming to sound judgement)? What is sound? Showing more than one side? Do you see "sound judgement" presented in these texts, or do these texts avoid sound judging (and write a very opinionated piece)? How did you listen to these texts? Did you make sound judgements, or were you more knee-jerk in your actions? Interesting essay on the past...

Ad hominem (logical fallacy) attacks from Trump during the 2016 election...why they might be effective.

Everything is trying to sell us some thing, some idea, some ideology--Analyzing advertising (Iphone X)

Or the problem with showing off your love, and your engagement diamonds, on Facebook or Twitter in the Journal 1 reading from Deadspin "On the Other Hand." In tumblr at the top of the page, there are questions you can use for Journal 1. What is her tone, and how can you tell?

Vocabulary--keep track of new words in your journal:

  • eschew
  • patriarchy
  • ?

May Discuss authorship? Journal ? (guide p. 89):

  • Do you think everyone's an author?
  • How do you define author?
  • Is an author different from a writer? In what specific ways?

 

 

Jan. 10

Thinking and Listening Rhetorically, Or Making Sound Judgements

Readings Due Before Class

  • Syllabus & Calendar
  • Everyone's an Author (EA): see Canvas Files for two of these three readings in case you are still waiting for this required textbook. Please read the following:
    • Introduction: Is Everyone an Author? (in Canvas Files)
    • Ch. 0 The Need for Rhetoric (in Canvas Files);
    • Ch. 1 Thinking Rhetorically (in Canvas Files)

 

Assignments due before class:

  • E. Mail Lee questions about the Syllabus (send it from your best email address).
  • Journal 1: In tumblr, look for and watch Corey Booker's speech "Real Power," and read the three questions in the tumblr so you know what to look for in the speech. Focus your writing on one of the questions in Tumblr, or do your own informal writing about what power is and what it has to do with you. Also do some informal writing about how Booker is persuading you to think about power, and also Aristotle's idea of Rhetoric (rhetoric is the art of coming to sound judgement--and our judgements often include symbolic meaning of texts and images), and of the "symbolic meaning" of power and it's images for different audiences? Did you make sound judgements, or were you more knee-jerk in your reactions? Write about 300 words, and post to Canvas Assignments.

 

Lecture Notes EA day 2:

Booker on Youtube--Real Power 3:15

Burke--we are symbol using animals; p. 5 war

You can keep your weekly jourals in certain folders with the following titles (I will collect pieces of them at Midterm):

The General Journal has

  • Vocabulary Journal--keep track of new words in your journal:
  • Fallacy Journal--logical fallacy or an error in logos or logic; the fallacy probably can't be supported with sufficient evidence:
    • ad hominem--attack the man--
    • hasty generalization
    • oversimplification--stereotypes
    • slippery slope
    • either/or
  • In-class General Writing Journal:
    • today we wrote about Wayne Booth's quote on rhetoric
Jan. 15 No class  
Jan. 17

The Rhetoric in Learning to Read, Write, and Understand, and Fallacies

Readings Due Before Class:

  • EA: ch. 2 Rhetorical Situations
  • EA: ch. 12 on the Literacy Narrative
  • Tumblr, Links from EA: "The Other Side is Not Dumb"; this is also under Canvas Files (take notes for class discussion--save all this for your final portfolio)

 

Assignments Due before class:

  • Vocabulary Journal: an informal way to keep track of new words you see in readings, documentaries, lectures etc. this semester. Try to learn a word a day to help extend your writing reach. I'll collect this at the Midterm or Final.
  • General/Reading Journal (keep this for in-class and out-of-class writing): when you think about other sides of issues, do you get defensive? How does the article you read above help you shift your ideas? Bring to class, but keep it for Midterm or Final.

 

Lecture Notes EA Day 3:

Keep discussing rhetoric or audience analysis

Avoiding the black and white mindset...

The other side...ie The veteran reporter Christiane Amanpour says she works at being "truthful, not neutral" as a journalist because some world players (in Bosnia, in Syria) are doing hideous and awful things, so there is no such thing as giving them equal time for "their side"

 

 

 

Vocabulary--keep track of new words in your journal:

  • chartreuse--a kind of baby shit green

 

Rhetorical situations contain:

 

 

Read a literacy narrative to see what's coming up, and to get ideas for your own literacy narrative...

 

 

 

Jan. 22

Reading and Prewriting, with thoughts toward your own Rhetorical choices

Readings Due Before Class:

  • EA narrative readings from ch. 12, and the back of the book: narrative essay samples (you should have read them already last time) pp. 190+ (Liar's Poker--experts and better experts and loosers and super rich gambling addicts); pp. 196+ (The Look--starting an education at a disadvantage?)
  • EA: ch. 17 Argument (isn't almost everything an argument?)
  • Handout online: Unit 1 Literacy Narrative Assignment
  • Library Tour--the library has an overall online video tour (Links to an external site), and a tour of Onesearch, the library's digital database of full-text articles, books, and videos (part 1; part 2; part 3; part 4). You should watch all of these videos. You can get extra credit for taking the physical tour of the library--The Reference Desk on the first floor usually also has a scavenger hunt in the library that's physically informative. When you're done, you can bring me the scavenger hunt card for credit. Finally, you can just go ahead and take the Library Tour Quiz in Canvas Assignments (it's not due until Feb. 14).


Assignments Due before class:

  • "Reading" Journal: take notes on ideas you have about the rhetoric--the techniques of persuasion--you see being used writing your own literacy narrative as you read the above readings. Also take notes on the story telling techniques used in the readings. Keep these notes. Be ready to discuss, but otherwise keep this in an easy-to-access place for points for the midterm or final.
  • Unit 1 Narrative Journal (2) to be uploaded to Canvas--but read EA ch. 12 first! In order to do some prewriting for ideas for your literacy narrative (your personal story about how you came to be an expert in X, and the difficulties and ), brainstorm or cluster or freewrite (or try all three) for at least 600+ informal words (one single-spaced page). You should think about/journal about the different details, moments in time, characters (you are the central "character"), settings, books or other literacy objects (where you gained expertise in some area or field or community etc. of your literacy narrative--you are looking for a pivotal moment where your increased literacy in English, Sports, Music, Software, Ballet, Hiking, Nutrition, Driving, Auto Mechanics, Geology etc. How did this increase in expertise change your life (negatively or positively), or allow you to join a community you have always wanted to join? How did the community you always wanted to join end up being less exciting or earth shattering than you thought it would be? In other words, how did you come to write, read, or understand a specific community's language and it's priviledges, and did you actually fit in? What's the central story? What backstory must be included? And what can you leave out? How can you make yourself a focused but three dimentional character (who tells a first person story)? Upload to Canvas Assignments by the start of class. Try to include at least some concrete, sensory detail, and some metaphors and similes like we discussed in class.
 

Lecture Notes EA Day 4:

In-class writing:

Reading Journal: visit literacy narratives via Tumblr; or read some of the stories Lee has made available to you.

Fallacy Vocabulary Journal--keep track of new words in your journal:

  • ad hominem: attack against the man, person--Lee's mom hated Helen Ready's folk music in 70's because mom thought Ready was a lesbian
  • hasty generalizationn: all x are y--all women are bad drivers
  • oversimplification; overgenaeralization--lacks "all"

oldA&B p. 351-52 (ch. 13 logical fallacies in the Classic Argument chapter)

Share some of your literacy/expert narrative ideas...

 

Our Library's OneSearch?? Or next class...

What literacy narratives did you read, and what did you notice about the ways they were written?

  • Narrative Structures
    • plot vs. story
    • Frytag's Triangle
    • Structure: chronological or organic
    • what is the so called high point or climax of your story?
  • Voice/Tone
  • Details
    • sensory details
    • metaphorical details
    • ambiguity
  • Thematic or philosophical ideas (Frost's "one thing more")
    • Robert Frost: "a poem is about one thing, and one thing more."
  • Argument as part of narrative
    • the other side?

 

    Journal? take some notes about things in your environment that you see connotatively, where you read between the lines or the visible details to come up with your own interpretation of a text, an event, an ad, a TV show, a Youtube blog, the clothing your friend's wear, the way a car looks (flashy? boring? sporty?) etc.

 

Jan. 24

Prewriting and Drafting a Narrative to get ready for Workshop


Readings Due Before Class:

  • Everyone's an Author: narrative readings from ch. 12, and the back of the book: narrative essay samples (you should have read them already last time) pp. 856+ (The Sanctuary of School--being saved by teachers with art supplies); pp. 862+ (Compulsory Reading--a graphic essay where "great" readers are supposed to read "great" books). Take some reading journal general notes as you notice the way these narratives are written, their beginings, middles, and ends. Does it start in the middle of their story--in media res--? If they use dialogue, how do they show character through speech? All stories have good and great descriptive detail or metaphors/similes to really get low on the scale of abstraction. How do details add to the essay's significance?
  • Tumblr Textbook links: actively/rhetorically read at least two literacy narratives from the ch. 12 links (on the left, then click on the Digital Archives of Literacy Narratives, and search or browse).
  • Handout in Canvas Files: Read two additional literacy/expertise narratives I put in Canvas Files under the literacy narrative folder.
  • Handout online: Unit 1 Literacy Narrative Assignment
  • Library Tour--the library has an overall online video tour (Links to an external site), and a tour of Onesearch, the library's digital database of full-text articles, books, and videos (part 1; part 2; part 3; part 4). Finally, you will be able to take the Library Tour Quiz in Canvas Assignments closer to Feb. 14th.

 

Assignments Due before Class:

  • Reading Journal: take some notes about the writing style of the two essays assigned today from EA (look above at the EA narrative essay titles and page numbers). What do you notice about time sequences? Is the story chronological, or does it jump around in time? Where is it surprising? Where does it bring in larger significance? What is the most specific description or metaphor/simile? Keep these in a single folder or booklet. I will collect these kinds of journals at midterm and finals for points and extra credit points if you go the extra mile. Be ready to discuss, but otherwise keep this in an easy-to-access place for points for the midterm or final.
  • Unit 1 Narrative Outline--due Jan. 25th by 11:59pm. Work on an outline or structured draft of your literacy/expertise narrative essay. I often look over my Journal 2 Freewriting and highlight key concepts and pivotal details, or three key scenes that I know I want to deal with in the draft, then I type out those lines again, and maybe lay out an outline if I'm ready, then draft: Here are two possible outline templates:
    • Literacy Narrative Outline 1 possibility:
      • Intro:
        • something eye catching--maybe the start of my story (see Freytag's Triangle)
        • perhaps an idea of the theme I'm going to deal with, but I might let this build as I go...
        • significance: this could get a few words--the one thing more
      • Body:
        • Any needed backstory? Or can you work it in as you go?
        • Where did you start with your non-expertise?
          • Needs concrete details as you describe yourself in this time
        • How did you start getting expertise? Was it hard? Yes! Conflict is important in a story...
        • When did you have an ah ha moment about finally being an expert? This is likely the climax or pivotal moment of the story (see Freytag's Triangle for narrative structure).
        • What does it look like being an expert?
      • Conclusion?
        • Where are you with all this now? How has it made your life better (or not)?
    • Literacy Narrative Outline 2 possibility: focus on three main tension-filled scenes of conflict and difficulty:
      • Intro: What got you into this?
      • 1st scene: what was the first challenge? 
      • 2nd scene: what was the second challenge?
        • At what point did you hit a wall? What got in the way?
          • Did maturity get in the way?
          • Did parents or siblings get in the way?
          • Did coaches or mentors get in the way…ause more difficulty than was already there?
          • Did prejudice get in the way from anyone?
      • 3rd scene: how, when, and where did you finally realize something major about your literacy/expertise?
        • When and how did you realize you were good at this?
        • When and how did you decide to continue with it? Or did you leave it behind, and why?
      • Conclusion that isn't just rehashing the essay
 

EA Lecture Notes Day 5:

 

 

OneSearch--you need 3-4 outside sources (media, print articles, videos) for your literacy narrative--to add details and significance to your narrative essay

Freytag's Triangle and a possible outline structure (see jan. 29)

You can start in media res--in the middle of a scene from your story. This can add more punch to the start of your narrative.

 

The elements of a narrative...checklist in EA ch. 12

What did you notice about writing in the new literacy narratives you read?

Robert Frost has a great quote for thinking about the significance of your narrative: "a poem is about one thing, and one thing more," or the theme or even thesis of your narrative might have multiple layers or multiple truths.

Theses in narratives...opened formed writing usually avoids a thesis in an introduction. A thesis in a conclusion is a bit more common

 

Narrative Elements again:

  • narration
  • description
    • low on the scale of abstraction
    • use similes, metaphors, analogy
  • exposition
    • bits of backstory scattered around
    • significance
  • dramatized scenes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

?? will bring 20 copies of a narrative essay to workshop story (10 pages, double-spaced MAX)? Be sure to upload Narrative Workshop stories to Canvas Discussions Narrative Workshop Drafts Here (we need 5 people to bring us drafts for full class workshop).

Jan. 29

Workshop Drafts, Writerly Craft: Details and Significance

Readings Due Before Class:

  • Everyone's an Author: bring it! We will keep discussing the sample narratives that we read last week.
  • Handout link: Unit 1 Literacy Narrative Assignment
  • Handout: EA Narrative rubric for commenting on (and grading) the literacy narrative
  • Peer Workshop Narrative Comments on Stories: bring comments on ?? stories that were passed out last time. Use the Narrative Grading and Revision Rubric (see link above) to help yourselves make good comments (if you miss a class, you need to pick up manuscripts in advance outside my office CB410d or on Canvas Discussions Narrative Workshop Drafts Here!).
  • Library Tour--don't forget! See links in readings above; quiz due Feb. 14

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • 4 of you in each section will bring copies of a narrative essay to workshop story (10 pages, double-spaced MAX)? Be sure to upload Narrative Workshop stories to Canvas Discussions Narrative Workshop Drafts Here (we need 4-5 new people to bring us drafts for full class workshop).
    • Sec. 606 5:30pm--Cody L., Emily W., Jesse H. bring 20
    • Sec. 605 7pm--, Roger, Aidan, Whitney bring 19
  • Unit 1 Research Journal: Use Onesearch and Google to find at least 3 or more articles or quotes that might help you add more detail or significance to your literacy narrative. These might give you good quotes, or interesting details, or good metaphors, or the one thing more, or someone else's similar or contrasting literacy narrative can be used to create additional tension in yours. Take notes about what you're reading in your general journal--call it research journal if you like (to be collected at midterm). Also keep track of search words you use. Try to incorporate three of these sources into your revision.
  • Unit 1 Early Draft of your literacy narrative (1200-1800 words, though your early draft might be shorter, maybe 600-900 to begin with) uploaded to Canvas Discussion before class. As you know, EA Ch. 12 is all about writing narratives, and you should have read this, but also read over the more specific Unit 1 Literacy Narrative Assignment before you start drafting. Narrative usually has a basic structure like Freytag's Triangle (or the three act restorative structure) with 1-3 climactic moments. What's the high point or biggest turning point of your literacy story? How did you become an expert in something, and what significance does this have in your life? All writing is a form of argument too, though. What claim/theme are you trying to support with your narrative? That might be your thesis, though it might be more implied than stated. Stories are often full of implications. I often look over my Unit 1 Narrative Journal 2 Freewriting and highlight key concepts and pivotal details that I know I want to deal with in the draft, then I type out those lines again, and maybe lay out an outline (see the previous class period), and then I draft (sometimes I just draft first, and think about structure later).

 

Announcements:

  • You can take your questions/ideas/drafts to the writing lab in LI 208 for analytical essay writing advice (and 5 points of extra credit)!

 

EA Lecture Notes Day 6:

OneSearch--you need 3-4 outside sources (media, print articles, videos) for your literacy narrative--to add details and significance to your narrative essay

Your own style...your voice

Junot Diaz--a very voice-y story; he's not a bad man. A voicey story "the sun, the moon, the starts"...he actually doesn't really change even by the end...always wanting magda even when she's obviously gone...

Freytag's Triangle--Aristotle came up with this first, but there are more sophisticated diagrams now to match more contemporary stories (which often still use classic structures)

Look at my highlighting of Willem and Fatima's essays (see them in Canvas Files, Literacy Narratives)

 

No exposition in dialogue!!

 

Vocabulary--keep track of new words in your journal:

Jan. 31

Workshop the Literacy Narrative

Readings Due Before Class:

  • EA ch. 27 MLA documentation style
  • EA Narrative rubric for commenting on (and grading) the literacy narrative
  • Peer Workshop Narrative Comments: bring comments on ?? stories that were passed out last time. Use the Narrative Grading and Revision Rubric (see link above) to help yourselves make good comments (if you miss a class, you need to pick up manuscripts in advance outside my office CB410d or on Canvas Discussions Narrative Workshop Drafts Here!).
  • Library Tour Quiz is coming up--don't forget links for OneSearch above.

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Bring copies of a narrative essay to workshop (10 pages, double-spaced MAX)? Be sure to upload Narrative Workshop stories to Canvas Discussions Narrative Workshop Drafts Here (we need 4-5 people to bring us drafts for full class workshop).
    • Sec. 606 5:30pm--Jalyssa A., Katie H., Hope L. Jessica A. bring 20 copies.
    • Sec. 605 7pm--?Braedon? make 19 copies.
  • Unit 1 Early Draft of your literacy narrative (1200-1800 words is our overall goal, though your early draft might be shorter, maybe 600-900 to begin with)--see the previous class day Assignments for more detail...I'm just adding some extra time here.
  • Unit 1 Research Journal: Use Onesearch and Google to find at least 3 or more articles or quotes that might help you add more detail or significance to your literacy narrative. These might give you good quotes, or interesting details, or good metaphors, or the one thing more, or someone else's similar or contrasting literacy narrative can be used to create additional tension in yours. Take notes about what you're reading in your general journal--call it research journal if you like (to be collected at midterm). Also keep track of search words you use. Try to incorporate three of these sources into your revision--see the article by Dave Hood on using research in creative nonfiction for a reminder of what sources can help you do.

 

Announcements:

  • You can take your questions/ideas/drafts to the writing lab in LI 208 for analytical essay writing advice (and 5 points of extra credit)!

 

EA Lecture Notes Day 7

MLA!

Library questions? What sources did you find?Think about the narratives going on in Boys in the Boat:

  • How many stories are being told?
  • With what structure are they being told? What comes first? Where does he interrupt the first narrative? What effect does this have?

 

Research with Narrative: and Personal Essay

  • Article by Dave Hood (blogger):
    • get more credibility--ethos (see Day 7 notes on Aristotle's Appeals)
    • find and be more accurate with facts
    • sources can give you the one thing more Frost talks about--the significance of your essay. I might use a philosopher or a famous thinker--say Freud who I'm teaching now, and his seemingly ridiculous Oedipal Complex that we go through by the time we are 4 years old...
    • think of metaphors based on what you read...Freud's Oedipal Complex is already alluding to the Greek Tragedy, Oedipus Rex

Your literacy narrative should have some elements of Argument:

  • A claim with good reasons (you may not have the best of reasons for your point in a personal narrative like this, though). The claim should be your thesis, or your one thing more, the point of your story, which might eventually be stated, but which should eventually be implied in multiple places throughout your narrative
  • Evidence to support those reasons
  • Multiple viewpoints (though your narrative is not a full fledged argument, so you might not include multiple POV's)

 

 

Vocabulary--keep track of new words in your journal:

 

EA Narrative rubric for commenting on (and grading) the literacy narrative

Exchange in groups...see Canvas Announcements for Group Assignments...

 

Look at some of the details in Boys in the Boat--most concrete? Overt statements of significance

 

 

 

Unit 1: a revised and better draft of your literacy narrative uploaded to Canvas Discussions for class workshop (1200-1800 words).

Feb. 5

Workshopping and MLA, and Comments from Lee

Readings Due Before Class:



Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Bring copies of a narrative essay to workshop story (10 pages, double-spaced MAX)? Be sure to upload Narrative Workshop stories to Canvas Discussions Narrative Workshop Drafts Here (we need 4-5 more people to bring us drafts for full class workshop).
    • Sec. 606--Shae A., Santos Q., Jordan G., Benjamin B. make 20 copies.
    • Sec. 605--?? make 19 copies.
  • Use Onesearch and Google to find more articles or quotes that might help you add more detail or significance to your literacy narrative as needed.

 

Announcements:

 

EA Lecture Notes Day 8:

Lee will start discussing drafts with students

MLA and Easybib.com and Purdue

MLA questions--Easybib.com!

 

Grammar vs. editing

 

Dialogue

 

 

 

MLA?? But we need time to meet so everyone's essay can be discussed

 

Vocabulary--keep track of new words in your journal:

Freytag's Triangle--slanted

The three-act restorative screen play or play...

 

Workshop old style--to class share in the groups I'll assign so everyone can write detailed comments right on your draft's page for next class. In this better draft, I'd like to see you use some research too--3 or 4 sources, but you might have to revise next week to include sources after you find them for next class. You also need to make a significant, argument-oriented deeper point (args need multiple POVs, evidence, and good reasons, most of which should be conveyed in the story). You will be assigned groups in class.  Be sure you make comments based on some of the elements of narrative and argument we've discussed, but also what we've discussed about "the one thing more" or significance.  And don't forget to think about the details in this narrative--do they get low on the scale of abstraction?  Do they use similes, metaphors, or analogies, and do these work, or could they push them more? Do they use sensory detail to paint pictures for the reader? Use the EA Narrative Rubric to help you comment.

Bring detailed written comments back for your groups' drafts based on the EA Narrative Rubric checklist that can give you ideas about what to comment on--remember, no attacks, no trolling comments, no comments that aren't useful for revision. We will get into our groups and discuss what you thought worked and what didn't work in each person's paragraphs/draft. Give each person at least 10-15 minutes of discussion.

 

Feb. 7

Workshopping Continued, and MLA Works Cited; Editing and Style; Comments From Lee

Readings Due Before Class:

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Bring copies of a narrative essay to workshop story (10 pages, double-spaced MAX)? Be sure to upload Narrative Workshop stories to Canvas Discussions Narrative Workshop Drafts Here (we need 4-5 people to bring us drafts for full class workshop).
    • Sec. 606--Nicole T., Anna P., Quinten H., Jared B. bring 20 copies.
    • Sec. 605--?? make 19 copies.
  • Unit 1 Narrative MLA Works Cited uploaded to Canvas Assignments by 11:59pm--come to class with questions, then revise before midnight if you can. This should just be a Works Cited page following MLA rules for the last page of your essay. See the Purdue Owl for general information about Works Cited entries for web/electronic sources.
  • Extra Credit: Plan some time to get additional comments from the writing center LI208 or online. If you still need to do a search, type in http://www.uvu.edu/library and Onesearch will be the first thing you see. Use Boolean limiters like and, not.

 

EA Lecture Notes Day 9

Vocabulary--keep track of new words in your journal:

MLA and Easybib.com and Purdue

 

MLA questions--Easybib.com!

 

Grammar vs. editing

 

Dialogue

 

later??Unit 1 Ex. 2 Four Highlighter Exercise: highlight different parts of your narrative to check narrative details and significant points. Submit a pdf or jpeg to Canvas Assignments.??

Feb. 14 Love

Final Narrative Workshop; and Reading Rhetorically--more Listening

Readings Due Before Class:

  • EA: pp. 297-339 (thumbs up; roadmap, samples)
  • Handout: Active Reading
  • Handout on Workshopping narratives
  • Bring EA--you can review the Style section for help with editing...
  • Handout: EA Narrative rubric for commenting on (and grading) the literacy narrative
  • Peer Workshop Narrative Comments: bring comments on 3-4 stories that were passed out last time. Use the Narrative Grading and Revision Rubric (see link above) to help yourselves make good comments (if you miss a class, you need to pick up manuscripts in advance outside my office CB410d or on Canvas Discussions Narrative Workshop Drafts Here!).
  • Library tour in person or online--see previous Calendar readings for the links. The library quiz is due next class.

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Bring copies of a narrative essay to workshop story (10 pages, double-spaced MAX)? Be sure to upload Narrative Workshop stories to Canvas Discussions Narrative Workshop Drafts Here (we need 4-5 people to bring us drafts for full class workshop).
    • Sec. 606--Shayla R.? and ?? bring 20 copies.
    • Sec. 605--?? make 19 copies.

 

EA Lecture Day 10

Editing

 

Vocabulary--keep track of new words in your journal:

 

 

Unit 1 Narrative Revision--Bring a revised draft to class to work on (a hard copy, or on your computer--your phone is usually too small for revision); be sure to also upload this revision to Canvas Discussions so Lee can perhaps comment, preferably with you face to face while students are workshopping and working in class...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feb. 19

Workshopping--more on details, evidence, quotes, and significance

Readings Due Before Class:

  • Peer Workshop Narrative Comments: bring comments on 3-4 stories that were passed out last time??
  • Scan our course Tumblr or Google, or newspapers like NYTimes.com for sample reviews, and for "texts" or objects you want to review (games, movies, TV shows, music, art, books, superbowl ads, cars, fashion shows, video games, shoes or a brand of shoes like Dr. Martens); choose 2 reviews and 2 objects, then read/watch/participate in them (make comments on the page or in your General Journal etc.)--read  reviews you find about objects (movies, art etc.) you have opinions about; watch a Youtube ad for the texts/objects/cars/art etc. you might want to review; think about how you might use these texts in your own review.
  • Read The Boys in the Boat ch. 12-14
  • Bring EA: ch. 29 (style)
  • EA ch. 15 (first half, on writing reviews)
  • Handout: Unit 2 Review Essay Assignment


Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Bring comments for Unit 1 Narrative Drafts!
  • Library Quiz Due in Canvas Quizzes (15 points) by 11:59pm. See above readings for links to helpful videos about our library. If you need to do a search, type in http://www.uvu.edu/library and Onesearch will be the first thing you see.

 

EA Lecture Day 11

EA Lecture Day 10 Additions

Vocabulary--keep track of new words in your journal:

 

 

Coming Up:

Unit 2, Journal 4: Review Essay Prewriting (Freewrite/Cluster/Brainstorm): after finding 2-4 reviews and 2-4 objects/texts you would like to review, do some guided journaling via freewriting or clustering or brainstorming etc. (EA ch. 15) to come up with details of the criteria you might want to use to judge whatever you have chosen to review.

Feb.21

Workshopping and Including Graphics, and Editing

Readings Due Before Class:

  • Peer Workshop Narrative Comments: bring comments on 3-4 stories that were passed out last time??

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Bring comments for Unit 1 Narrative Drafts!

 

Lecture Notes Day 12

Grammar du jour:

Comma Splice!

Feb. 26

Review or Judgement of a "Text" or Object or Subject

Readings Due Before Class:

  • Scan our course Tumblr or Google, or newspapers like NYTimes.com for sample reviews, and for "texts" or objects you want to review (games, movies, music, art, books, superbowl ads, cars); choose 2 reviews and 2 objects, then read/watch/participate in them (make comments on the page or in your General Journal etc.)--read  reviews you find about objects (movies, art etc.) you have opinions about; watch a Youtube ad for the texts/objects/cars/art etc. you might want to review; think about how you might use these texts in your own review.
  • EA ch. 15 finish (on writing reviews, your next major essay for our class)
  • Bring Boys in the Boat (be ready to answer questions)
  • If you are a slow reader, you may want to start Reading Boys in the Boat ch. 1-3--take good notes or annotate so that it's easy to find interesting hot spots later, places, topics, ideas, controversies that you might want to argue about in your final argument essay in April.
  • Handout: Unit 2 Review Essay Assignment
  • Handout: editing marks you might see on your papers

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Unit 1 Literacy Narrative Final Draft Due--May 5 (especially if you are getting comments this week)--by 11:59pm! With 3-4 outside sources, (quotes, stats, info, video links, graphics), and spanning 1200-1800 words. Use MLA format and documentation. Be sure to do a final edit like reading it out loud, or reading it backwards sentence by sentence then correcting it before you turn it in. Upload to Canvas Assignments in PDF format (save a doc or docx or Google doc as a PDF). If you still need to do a search, type in http://www.uvu.edu/library and Onesearch will be the first thing you see. When you search, use Boolean limiters like "and," "or," "not."
  • May Start in class Unit 2 Review Journal (3) part 1: prewriting for topic ideas by Read the Unit 2 Review Essay Assignment and EA ch. 15 first, then find 3 reviews via Google or Onesearch.

Lecture Notes Day 13

 

Look at a review aggregator like RottenTomatoes.com. The professional reviewers have fun, and make their audiences laugh like drag queens throwing shade (some reviewers are almost that good).

Look at sample reviews in Youtube:

 

Vocabulary--keep track of new words in your journal:

  • High Concept films are what film people call Hollywood Films that are created to make money like Action Films from the Western or Sci Fi or Horror genres...
  • Low Concept films are about characters in conflict, and have a focus on character...

??Canvas Quiz on first half of The Boys in the Boat; ch. 1-10?? NOT YET

Feb. 28

Reviewing or Judging Exciting Objects, or Making Reviews more Exciting, and Organizing Reviews

Readings Due Before Class:

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Unit 2 Review Journal (3) part 2: Start in Class--Prewriting for the object/text/event you want to review, the judgement you might want to make, and the criteria you might want to use to support or flesh the judgement--much of this is explained in EA ch. 15, so read that and read the Unit 2 Review Essay Assignment first before you do this assignment. You can turn in freewriting and brainstorming, and even some initial browsing research in your journal as you prepare to write the essay. Your initial research was to look up three reviews, so include that, but look for additional ideas as you focus your freewrite. Try to get more than 600 words. What are your opinions overall? What are your opinions about small aspects of this object? What criteria seem to be coming up that you want to base your opinions on? Don't be afraid to add more sources to your journal, or another review subject you can contrast with your main review subject (sometimes a review contrasting two things is easier--two films, two short stories, two athletic shoes, two sporting events etc). You can also find a review you want to specifically argue against--maybe someone hated a movie you loved, or loved a movie you hated (or a sporting event you loved or hated, or a song or album you love or hate). Also think about how you will make sure your review is fair by including at least one thing that was good or bad about that film/shoe/race. Be sure to keep any articles, reviews, sources, etc. you find or produce about this. In class, I showed students my own clustering for a review of the movie Alien, and then also did clustering for one of their subjects. Today In Class we will have time to start this freewrite. Upload to Canvas by 11:59pm from today until March 5th. Click here for a prewriting sample.

Announcement:

  • You can go to the writing lab in LI 208 to get ideas on what you want to judge for your review, and ask about more ideas about the criteria you can use to judge your object/text...

 

Lecture Notes Day 14

 

Look at sample reviews in ch. 15

  • p. 331--A review of the film Inside Out
  • p. 336--Review of Serial, a podcast
  • p. 314--Review and history of Monolopy the game

Evidence--the body of your essay needs description and close reading interpretations of aspects that are not easy to demonstrate like the sounds music makes (bass, trebble, but also muddy, tinny, obscured), or aesthetics of a shoe (the power of a classic pump/stilletto)

Do some close reading analysis in class of Inside Out; also look at the review of Inside Out EA p. 331+

Close reading for 1010...

 

Look at sample reviews in Youtube!

Look at some theories you can use to write a review or a critique:

  • A video essay on Damsels in Distress in video games which has elements of review or judgement in it based on feminist equality theory (from Feminist Frequency; she has received death threats for these reviews/critiques, and thus the comments are now disabled--Lee doesn't understand, but some feminists like Betty Freidan say it's because of how men think masculine identity is threatened...)
  • What about using socioeconomic theories to help your review/critique? Some people look at ads and discuss their sexism. Some look at ads and see the way they push consumerism and the out of control need to buy things the American Dream seems to push at us...

 

Vocabulary--keep track of new words in your journal:

--A well supported evaluation (good logos) EA p. 307

--Background
--Other's Opinions
--A Clear judgement
---Three Reasons for the claim (your because statements)
-----Evidence for the reasons
-----Acknowledge the good in the bad
-----And the bad in the good
-----What are other’s differing opinions about certain aspects?
--Conclusion--say something newish

 

Mar. 5

Unit 2, Summary and Review of an Article, our next Essay; Workshop, and Judgement and Close Reading Analysis as Evidence; And Parallelism

Readings Due Before Class:

  • EA ch. 15--be sure you've read the sample reviews starting on p. 314; the Inside Out review starts on p. 331.
  • EA ch. 13 (analysis--a big part of your reviewing evidence or details).
  • Handout: Review Essay Revision Checklist and Rubric
  • Read your research

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Start In Class--as a way to think about structure before you outline, try some Unit 2 Organizational Clustering for your Unit 2 Review Essay (can be turned in under Unit 2 Review Outline). Look over your previous Unit 2 Freewriting that we did at the end of class (and that you extended at home), and highlight your main ideas (your main judgement, and your possible and best criteria). Then take what might be your main judgement and put it at the center of your piece of "paper." Your criteria will likely be the off shoots from your center circle. Start adding details to each of the offshoots--which ones seem to generate the most ideas and details? You can then focus on three of those for your essay draft of your Unit 2 Review Essay. Or do some of this on your own, and we will add to it in class next time.
  • Start Unit 2 Review Research Journal (4)--use Onesearch and Google to help you look for scholarly and lay articles that might give you more information about the genre of your text/object, and also proper evidence as is laid out in EA p. 307. You should have already looked up reviews of the very thing you want to review so you can be aware of how others write about that kind of genre of object like cell phones, books, movies, music, shoes, etc., but also so you can perhaps argue with their review which is always a good way to do a specific review. Be able to discuss at least one source today.
  • Be ready to answer questions about hot spots in The Boys in the Boat ??
  • Final Draft of Unit 1 Narrative last day to turn it in!!

 

Announcement:

  • You can go to the writing lab in LI 208 to get ideas on what you want to judge, and ideas about the criteria you can use to judge your object/text...

 

Lecture Notes Day 15

 

EA ch. 13--analysis or close reading

Grammar du jour--parallelism between paragraphs, and within sentences/thesis statements

 

do some close reading analysis in class...continue with Inside out; look at some of your outlines, but also

Close reading for 1010...and what we could call "subtext" or the underlying, unspoken meaning between the lines (also called implied meaning)

 

p. 126-27 in instructor manual...

 

General Journal due next week...

Workshop on Monday...

 

??Unit 2 Review Journal 5--bring journal notes where you flesh out:

--A well supported evaluation (good logos) EA p. 307

--Background
--Other's Opinions
--A Clear judgement
---Three Reasons for the claim (your because statements)
-----Evidence for the reasons
-----Acknowledge the good in the bad
-----And the bad in the good
-----What are otherís differing opinions about certain aspects?
--Conclusion--say something newish

 

 

Mar. 7

Workshop, and More on Analysis

Readings Due Before Class:

  • EA--bring it (be sure you've read ch. 13 about analysis since the review requires analytic details)
  • Read your research

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Unit 2 Review Essay Research--use Onesearch and Google (3-4 sources at least) to help you find more articles that might give you more information about the genre of your text/object, and give you background, stats, and the web page presentation for that object--you can read about the use of good evidence in EA p. 307+. You should have already looked up reviews of the very thing you want to review so you can be aware of how others write about that kind of genre of object like cell phones, books, movies, music, shoes, etc., but also so you can perhaps argue with their review which is always a good way to do your own specific review.
  • Unit 2 Review--Start a Detailed Outline, but the full outline is due March 12 (the second thing you turn into this part of Canvas) based on your Prewriting journal 3, the criteria you brainstormed, and Research (this is likely in Canvas Assignments already)--due from today until tomorrow March 8th):
    • Intro: Background
      • you've had a lot of experience with X (Fashion Tennis Shoes, over-the-ear headphones, Sci-Fi..., Pixar movies)
    • Judgement/Claim/Thesis: I dislike the movie Inside Out...
    • 3-5 Reasons (criteria) for your Judgement--your "because statements"; I dislike the movie Inside Out because (the rule of 3's or thirds works here; when Romney ran against Obama in 2012, he broke the rule of 3's and was made fun of):
      • Reason 1--criterion 1:
        • specific evidence supporting reason 1
          • this might include defining criterion 1
        • write some very specific, analytic "close reading" descriptions that really help the reader sense what you are talking about, (Lee began talking about close reading last week--how do you describe an obviously "evil" face? By slitted eyes, and the thinning of lips)
        • then interpret those details
        • then explain how those details support your reason 1 (slitted eyes and thinning lips are both cliches used in our "low art" to indicate anger, but maybe also evil)
        • are there any good or bad things to also bring up that go against your main opinion, or that help you be more fair?
        • are there any source details, stats, or short quotes to bring up supporting Reason 1 and/or your close, analytical interpretations?
      • Reason 2--criterion 2
        • specific details to support the reason
        • explain how those details support the reason
        • good or bad aspects that go against your reason
        • other source details that help support your evidence
      • Reason 3--criterion 3
        • same...
      • Conclusion--not just a repetition of the whole essay, but something about the larger meaning of the object/film (how it's awfulness makes our culture more rotton than it has to be)
  • Sign up to meet with Lee about your Review Draft.
  • You could also be drafting your review over the weekend if you have your outline done...

 

Announcement:

  • You can go to the writing lab in LI 208 to get ideas on what you want to review/judge, and ideas about the criteria you can use to review/judge your object/text, and also on the level of detail you will need to fully support your judgements (like descriptions of details and Close Reading of those details or small quotes, small images, small scenes where you give your interpretation of what you are seeing; your interpretation is likely to be partially based on your thesis)...

 

Lecture Notes Day 16

Discuss close reading: description and interpretation

Ch. 13--do some analysis in class...

Look at a few reviews for Bao: think about details, criteria, audience...

 

Outlining and Clustering

 

Sign up to meet with Lee about your Review

 

--think about detailed evidence and close reading with your own essays

Grammar du jour?

 

??Heads up: 2nd Quiz Boys in the Boat first half (up to ch. 10) due in Canvas by Friday 11:59pm.?????In Class Journal 4??: practice close reading analysis with one or two aspects of your review to help make your evidence more specific

Mar. 12

Workshop the Review with Analysis--Don't Miss!

Readings Due Before Class:

--EA pp. 319-324--read the literary review and make special note of it's criteria and structure (does it use "because statements")
--Handout:
Unit 2 Rubric/revision checklist

Assignments Due TODAY:

  • Unit 2 Review--Detailed Outline due by 11:59pm--be sure this is detailed if you want all 20 points
  • Sign up to meet with Lee about your review draft...

 

Announcements:

  • Go to the Writing Lab for extra credit in LI 208: (801) 863-8099. They can give you ideas about structure and research, and you get 5 points of extra credit.
  • Check your grades in Canvas
  • Check your essay comments in Canvas

 

Lecture Notes Day 17

Consultations

Grammar du jour?

Sign up to meet with Lee about your Review

 

When should I accept these extra credit assignments? Outside Documentary Reaction--upload by 11:59pm tonight. This reaction might be about the documentary based on the book The Boys in the Boat from PBS; or the video should at least complement something from your review subject. 600 intelligent, focused words from a documentary or some other text.

Mar. 14

 

 

Workshop the Review--Don't Miss!

Readings Due Before Class:

--EA ch. 29
--Handout: Unit 2 Rubric/revision checklist
--Boys in the Boat--bring it

 

Assignments Due TODAY:

  • Early Draft of your Unit 2 Review Essay (with analysis) uploaded to Canvas Discussions.
  • Find more sources as needed; work on your MLA Works Cited and In-Text Citations...

 

Announcements:

  • Start turning in late work!

 

Lecture Notes Day 18

Moving from your criteria to your 3 reasons for liking/hating your review text...

Grammar du jour?... and think about Style via Voice

Consultations with Lee during and after class...

consultations--in class and after class, and on other days--sign up today!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mar. 18-22

Spring Break--no class

 

 

Mar. 26

Analysis/Review Details, and Workshops

Readings Due Before Class:

.

Assignments Due:

  • Workshop Drafts for class:
    • Sec. 606: Ben and Shae will bring 17 hard copies of your Unit 2 Review Essay (with analysis and opinion and metaphor in the body paragraphs) for a full group workshop
    • Sec. 605: Dominick and Celest will bring 13 hard copies of your Unit 2 Review Essay more revised draft. (with analysis and opinion and metaphor in the body paragraphs) for a full group workshop
  • Find more sources as needed; work on your MLA Works Cited and In-Text Citations...

 

Announcements:

  • All previous late work due!!
  • you can get some extra credit by going to the Writing Center in LI 208

.

Lecture Notes Day 19

 

You can do a 2nd documentary reaction for extra points:> Extra Credit Outside Documentary Reaction--upload by Ap. 25. This reaction might be about a documentary based on specific parts of theThe Boys in the Bo book at from PBS; or the video should at least complement something from your review subject. 600 intelligent, focused words from a documentary or some other text.

 

Upcoming Outside Documentary Assignment: 600 words reacting to a few specific parts of a documentary dealing with some topic in Boys in the Boat (NOT the PBS video). Youtube and Netflix are full of documentaries, but so is our library's film collection (Films on File????). I can ask that any of them be put in Canvas if that helps you.

 

Mar. 28

Workshops, and Style/Voice--Formality vs Informality, Transitions, and Good Sentences


Readings Due Before Class
:

  • Peer Unit 2 Review Essays read and commented on.
  • EA ch. 31 good sentences, and ch. 32 revision ideas
  • Handout: Unit 2 Rubric/revision checklist
  • Boys in the Boat! Bring it...

Assignments Due TODAY:

  • Who will bring 5 hard copies of your Unit 2 Review Essay for small group workshops?
    • Sec. 606:
    • Sec. 605:
  • Bring back comments on Unit 2 Review Essay drafts you got in the last class.  Be sure to check your Canvas Inbox in case you have group members trying to send you a draft, or request your draft so if they miss class they can still participate in the workshop.
  • Find more sources as needed for your Review Essay.
  • See sign up sheet for consultations--also on Canvas Announcements?

 

Announcements:

  • Go to the Writing Lab for extra credit in LI 208: (801) 863-8099. They can give you ideas about structure and research, and you get 5 points of extra credit.
  • Check your grades in Canvas
  • Check your essay comments in Canvas

Lecture Notes Day 20

 

EA ch. 31 and 32--revision help--questions!?

Stasis Interrogation as a way to think more deeply about a topic (from Boys in the Boat)!!

Argument about a controversy in Boys in the Boat

Controversial conversations about Boys in the Boat...

 

Good sentences du jour from EA ch. 31

 

Documentary Assignment--watch a documentary dealing with some topic in Boys in the Boat. Youtube and Netflix is full of documentaries, but so is our library's film collection (films on File????)

A&B ch. 17--oldp 453, 477 (old before new), p. 456 (avoid plot summaries and encyclopedia essays), p. 458 (avoid Engfish or cliched truism essays); p. 473 (particulars, or details),

 

??Consultations--No Class--meet in Lee's office CB410d after signing up for a time the previous class--no class

...see Canvas Announcements to look for times in the schedule when you can meet with me, choose 3 times, and email me with your request...

There are also Canvas Chat times in case you can't come in...these are somewhat flexible, so if you want a Chat, be sure to sign up for two appointments, or give me other suggestions that are not already scheduled...

Ap. 2

Review Workshops; Introduce Unit 4 Essay--Argument Essay on a Controversy from Boys in the Boat...Joining a Controversial "Conversation" in Boys in the Boat--Start with a Question with no Single Right Answer--a Controversy

Readings:

  • Peer Unit 2 Review Essays read and commented on.
  • EA ch. 17 and 18--be sure you've read this chapter on Argument Analysis (stasis questions, appeals, fallacies)
  • EA ch. 11 (we read this Classic Argument chapter earlier--be sure you've read it, or review it before drafting your Outline)
  • Bring Boys in the Boat every day
  • Finish Boys in the Boat--Bring research or research notes for Boys in the Boat every day
  • EA read the Sprigg's argument "On Buying Local" (150-158)
  • Handout: EA 1010 Unit 4 Argument Essay Assignment

 

Assignments to work on:

  • Who will bring 5 hard copies of your Unit 2 Review Essay for small group workshops?
    • Sec. 606:
    • Sec. 605:
  • Bring back comments on your groups' Unit 2 Review Essay drafts.  Be sure to check your Canvas Inbox in case you have group members trying to send you a draft, or request your draft so if they miss class they can still participate in the workshop.

 

Announcements:

 

Lecture Notes Day 21

 

Discuss topics from Boys in the Boat:

--Controversies about Parenting.
--Controversies about work
--Controversies about minimum wage
--Controversies about college sports
--Controversies about Olympics
--Controversies about poverty
--Controversies about marriage
--Controversies about propaganda and sales

Discuss research:

.

Discuss documentary reaction due soon...

.

Outside Documentary Assignment: 600 words reacting to a few specific parts of a documentary dealing with some topic you want to argue about from Boys in the Boat (NOT the PBS video Boys of '36). Youtube and Netflix are full of documentaries, but so is our library's film collection (Films on File). I can ask that any of them be put in Canvas Course Media if that helps you...

.

...Youtube has some different approaches to Stasis Questions (but the goal is always to use the questions to help yourself find a really good claim for a classic argument)...

 

--After the stasis questions, Journal 6 part 2 think of a position you can take about one of the topics you've brainstormed...something you can clearly argue about because there are many opinions abouty it; something from Boys in the Boat...

.

Ap. 4

Argument analysis of something interesting and controversial from The Boys in the Boat, and Fallacies

Readings Due Before Class:

  • Peer Unit 2 Review Essays read and commented on.
  • Unit 4 Argument Essay Checklist/Grading Rubric
  • Watch the PBS version of the book, Boys of '36, a documentary about the team that won the gold.
  • Bring Boys in the Boat every day
  • Bring research or research notes for Boys in the Boat every day
  • Bring EA (be sure you've read the key chapters, 11, 13 and 17)
  • Start finding sources that might add evidence or ideas to your argument
  • Bring EA--be sure you've read Sprigg's argument "On Buying Local" (150-158)
  • Unit 4 Argument Essay Assignment

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Who will bring 5 hard copies of your Unit 2 Review Essay for small group workshops?
    • Sec. 606:
    • Sec. 605:
  • Journal 6 part 1: due to Canvas Discussions--answer the stasis interrogation questions from the Unit 4 Argument essay assignment, trying to find a specific and interesting argument claim you want to defend in your final essay.
    • the goal is to come up with a specific issue or controversy from the book that you can analyze, find sources about, and then write a great argument about from The Boys in the Boat including a possible solution or ending of a controversy/argument...
    • be sure you answer at least one question from below's (Stasis Questions) in the Unit 4 essay assignment dealing with the controversy you brainstormed about today. 387-389 (there are no single right answers):
        1. What are the facts?
        2. What are the definitions of terms?
        3. What are the morals or ethics? The controversies?
        4. What are the possible solutions?
  • In class--Journal 6 Part 2--add more in class and after class--we're trying to find our topic, our controversy, our argument from something in Boys in the Boat. Keep writing down ideas, or try clustering or brainstorming if that helps you. You can also include any ideas from documentaries you watched dealing wiuth Boys in the Boat's American Experience video, or any documentary from Films on File dealing with a topic from the book. Add any of this to Journal 6. Upload this to Canvas Journal 6. An example is how our country, and even individual families, deals with poverty (but the way this is stated isn't controversial yet). Another example is, are the Olympics really necessary, especially given that now they are so expensive?
  • You can consider Journal 6 Part 3 Research due next time to be a place for your Research supporting your argument claim--put in articles/links or Works Cited entries from Onesearch, Google, Youtube, and Films on File. Be sure you have at least 5-10 sources for next class.
  • Be sure you do the course evaluation in My UVU! You can get extra credit for doing it!
  • All late work that is still worth points is due!!

 

Announcements:

  • Check your grades in Canvas--what are you missing?
  • Heads Up--All extra Credit Outside Documentary Reactions due Ap. 26! All extra credit Writing Lab visits due (up to 5 @ 5 points each) Dec. 7. Be careful about writing center closures during finals.
  • I will talk to people individually in class about the first pages of their drafts...if you don't get a chance to talk to me, you can send me an email to mortenle@uvu.edu asking for a little feedback.

 

 

Lecture Notes Day 22

 

Logos and Fallacies!!

 

Claims: p.383-387

Appeals p. 389+

Fallacies EA p. 400+; or try Purdue's Fallacies list:

4 Structures of Argument p. ?

  • Classical
  • Toulmin--think of philosophical grounds for the claim
  • Rogerian
  • Invitational

 

Watch bits of some videos coming from topics in Boys in the Boat:

 

Appeals--for your evidence--will you use pathos? Or will your focus on ethos and logos?

Outside Doc Reaction 1, and extra credit Reactions...

Believing that you are the only one who can save the world, or Make America Great Again, is often the basis of tyranny. Fallacies can often help you point out the "figments" of someone's absolutist or simplistic binary thinking.

Logical Fallacies/Fallacies--from Purdue!

  • Post Hoc
  • Non Sequitur
  • Ad Hominem
  • Red Herring
  • False Analogy
  • False Authority
  • Slippery Slope
  • Hasty Generalization
  • Oversimplification
Ap. 9

The Argument Details, and avoiding and analyzing Logical Fallacies

Readings due Before Class:

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Final Draft of Unit 2 Review Due by 11:59pm: 1200-1800 words, 3-4 sources, MLA format and documentation including in-text citations and a Works Cited page; sources include graphics, sources with more info, sources about the other side).
  • Unit 4 Journal 6 part 3 Research: at least 5-10 good sources as needed for your argument. Keep track of web addresses, works cited entries, search words that work and those that don't work, and keep some notes about what you are reading for each article or site.
  • In Class...Unit 4 Journal 6 Part 2, topics and stasis questions worked on (thus some research should be part of this) so you can get a specific argument claim (EA pp. 120+). Due to Canvas.
  • ??Sign up for a consultation if you want to discuss your upcoming essay
  • Be sure to complete the UVLink course evaluation! You can get extra credit for doing it!

 

Lecture Notes Day 23

Reading your sources with analysis and a critical eye...

 

Modeling of outlining, looking at your positions/argument claims...

Argument Rubric

Logical Fallacies--common in political speeches, but they should not be anywhere in your own arguments...EA p. 400

  • hasty generalizations and oversimplifications (all women are bad drivers--there is no absolute evidence of this)
  • bandwagoning (join us, we're cool and smart and rich)
  • slippery slope--if we have to pass background checks for guns now, that will lead to our guns being confiscated, and we will have no protection against the foreign terroristic hoardes etc.

Logical appeals, or types of good evidence EA p. 394

Writing a professional Cover Letter: Purdue OWL has three formats; Make Me A Cover Letter (but it's formatting doesn't look precisely right)

Ap. 11

Outlines, Body Paragraphs, and Workshop Drafts! And Transitions, and Logical Fallacies

Readings due Before Class:

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Unit 4 Argument Outline--Due Nov. 30th in Canvas by 11:59pm; in class we will think more about filling out a preliminary Argument Outline--find a focused and controversial classical argument claim from stasis questions in the Unit 4 Assignment that hopefully also make you start researching. Be sure you look at the structure of the sample argument "On Buying Local" EA pp. 150-158. The outline should have at least the basics: Claim; Reasons (or Because statements); and at least hints at Evidence/Data to flesh and support the Reasons.
    • Intro--what's the issue and it's context/background? Who cares about this? Why do you care? Why do I care? How did you get your idea from Boys in the Boat?
    • Position/Claim (at the end of the intro): I believe X about an issue/controversy from Boys in the Boat; the Olympics is all about propaganda which pulls the wool over people's eyes about what's really going on in the host country (Germany in 1936; Sochi in 2015); the rest is about The American Dream being promoted for the athletes most of whom never get rich.
      • 3-5 reasons or "because statements" or subclaims narrowing and supporting your claim--1. Propaganda often preceeds darker more violent deeds
        • multiple data points or evidence from your own experience or knowledge, from Boys, from the documentary you chose, and from your research (Google and OneSearch)
        • ie Germany, Russia both used the Olympics to show their peacefulness, but then attacked another country quickly after the games were over
        • ...when did Russia invade Chrimea? 2015, after the Sochi 2014 games...
      • 2. The American dream is a kind of propaganda because it's claims aren't necessarily true even though we are constantly bombarded with it's messages during the Olympics
        • NEEDS SPECIFIC EVIDENCE, DEFINITIONS, EXPLANATIONS...
      • 3. ANOTHER REASON OR BECAUSE STATEMENT...
  • Heads Up: Outside Documentary Reaction: Heads up--Due Fri. Dec. 7 by 11:59pm. 600 words reacting to a the most interesting, specific parts of a documentary dealing with some topic in Boys in the Boat (NOT the PBS video, though)--in other words, the film should have something to do with your Unit 4 Argument Essay. Do not just summarize! Think about the logic of the film (does it seem reasonable in tone, or does it contain logical fallacies, or think about it's audience choices (rhetoric; who is it writing for?).What surprises you? What evidence can you use from the documentary for your argument, and how will you use it? Look to your braistorm/freewrite/cluster in Journal 6 for some ideas you might want to focus your documentary on . Hitler believed in a master race, the Aryan race that would take over the world and breed only the best stock for the future Reich--Fun as !%@$! Youtube and Netflix are full of documentaries related to many of the topics in Boys, and so is our library's film collection--go to Onesearch and select films, then use some of the search words you've been using to find sources. I can ask that any film be put in Canvas if that helps you.
  • Sign up for a consultation about your argument essay...
  • Be sure to complete the UVLink course evaluation! You can get extra credit for doing it! Upload your receipt to Extra Credit in Canvas before the end of Dec. 13!

 

ANNOUNCEMENT

  • Sign up for consultation
  • Take the course evaluation and get extra credit

 

Lecture Notes Day 24

 

More modeling outlining, focusing, discussion of Boys in the Boat, searching for and reading sources...

Ap. 16

Workshop Drafts! Do not miss! And Commas, Fallacies

Readings due Before Class:

  • Unit 4 Argument Essay Checklist/Grading Rubric
  • EA ch. 36 (on portfolios--skim this, but focus on the "essay" or cover letter part of this assignment)
  • Be sure to use For example, or it's synonyms or antonyms, in your Unit 4 argument essay before every single example. Look Right to see some possible words you can use.

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Who will bring 5 hard copies of your Unit 2 Review Essay for a large group workshop?
    • Sec. 606: bring 17 copies
    • Sec. 605: bring 13 copies
    Bring back comments next class time!
  • Advice: Be sure to avoid fallacies (look right), and use transitions: "For example" is adequate to forcast that you are going to show the reader a very needed bit of evidence for your argument (use it's synonyms or antonyms, as well as other transitional words/phrases in your Unit 4 argument essay before every single example. Look below right to see some possible words you can use.
  • Sign up for a consultation about your argument essay...
  • Be sure to complete the UVLink course evaluation! You can get extra credit for doing it! Upload your receipt to Extra Credit in Canvas before the end of April.

 

ANNOUNCEMENT

  • Sign up for consultation
  • Take the course evaluation and get extra credit

 

 

Announcements

  • Sign up for Consultations

Lecture Notes Day 25

 

Who needs argument help? Come see me during class after I'm done lecturing

 

Fallacies

Max Born, an early father of quantum physics, said about evil, "'I believe that ideas such as absolute certitude, absolute exactness, final truth, etc. are figments of the imagination which should not be admissible in any field of science[. . . ]This loosening of thinking seems to me to be the greatest blessing which modern science has given to us. For the belief in a single truth and in being the possessor thereof is the root cause of all evil in the world.'"

Believing that you are the only one who can save the world, or Make America Great Again, is often the basis of tyranny. Fallacies can often help you point out the "figments" of someone's absolutist thinking.

Logical Fallacies/Fallacies--from Purdue!

  • Post Hoc
  • Non Sequitur
  • Ad Hominem
  • Red Herring
  • False Analogy
  • False Authority
  • Slippery Slope
  • Hasty Generalization
  • Oversimplification

For Example and other Transitions:

Illustration

Thus, for example, for instance, namely, to illustrate, in other words, in particular, specifically, such as.

Contrast

On the contrary, contrarily, notwithstanding, but, however, nevertheless, in spite of, in contrast, yet, on one hand, on the other hand, rather, or, nor, conversely, at the same time, while this may be true.

Ap. 18

Workshop Drafts! And more Fallacies; Comma Splices!

Readings due Before Class:

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Who will bring 5 hard copies of your Unit 2 Review Essay for a large group workshop?
    • Sec. 606: bring 5 copies
    • Sec. 605: bring 5 copies
    Bring back comments next class time!
  • Be sure to complete the UVLink course evaluation! You can get extra credit for doing it! Upload your receipt to Extra Credit in Canvas before the end of April.

 

 

Announcements

  • Sign up for Consultations

Lecture Notes Day 26

 

More Fallacies:

 

Comma Spices, Fragments, and Fused Sentences...

 

Who needs to meet with me during class while others are workshopping?

 

 

???***Unit 5 Portfolio Cover Letter assignment***?????

EA ch. 36 (on portfolios--skim this, but focus on the "essay" or cover letter part of this assignment)

ANNOUNCEMENT--NO FALLACIES QUIZ

BE working on the cover letter for your portfolio.

Ap. 23

Workshop Drafts! And more Fallacies; Comma Splices!

Readings due Before Class:

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Who will bring 5 hard copies of your Unit 2 Review Essay for a large group workshop?
    • Sec. 606: bring 5 copies
    • Sec. 605: bring 5 copies
    Bring back comments next class time!
  • Be sure to complete the UVLink course evaluation! You can get extra credit for doing it! Upload your receipt to Extra Credit in Canvas before the end of April.

 

 

Announcements

  • Sign up for Consultations

 

Lecture Notes Day 27?

Ap. 25

Thurs.

Workshops

Readings due Before Class:

 

Assignments Due Before Class:

  • Who will bring 5 hard copies of your Unit 2 Review Essay for a large group workshop?
    • Sec. 606: bring 5 copies
    • Sec. 605: bring 5 copies
    Bring back comments next class time!
  • Advice: Be sure to use For example, or it's synonyms or antonyms, in your Unit 4 argument essay before every single example. Look Right to see some possible words you can use.
  • Be sure to complete the UVLink course evaluation! You can get extra credit for doing it! Upload your receipt to Extra Credit in Canvas before the end of April.

 

Announcements

  • Sign up for Consultations

 

Lecture Notes Day 28?

Ap. 26

Fri.

 

No Class--reading day

Reading day--No Classes. Consultations! Be sure you sign up to see Lee before today. She might be in her office CB410d from 2:15pm until around 6pm

StudyPalooza all day--writing center help (and extra credit), relaxation, food...in the SC Grand Ballroom all day...?

 

Assignments Due:

  • Outside Documentary Reaction: Heads up--Last chance today! Fri. Dec. 7 by 11:59pm. 600 words reacting to a the most interesting, specific parts of a documentary dealing with some topic in Boys in the Boat (NOT the PBS video, though)--in other words, the film should have something to do with your Unit 4 Argument Essay.
  • Extra Credit Outside Documentary Reactions due if you are doing them--up to two are allowed, but this is the hardest way to get extra credit! Upload to Canvas Assignments Extra Credit.
  • You may only have a few times when you can use the writing center for advice (and extra credit) during finals week if they are even there at all...
  • Be sure to complete the UVLink course evaluation! You can get extra credit for doing it! Upload your receipt to Extra Credit in Canvas before the end of Dec. 13.

 

Extra Credit Outside Documentary Reaction--upload by Ap. 25. This reaction might be about the documentary based on the book The Boys in the Boat from PBS; or the video should at least complement something from your review subject. 600 intelligent, focused words from a documentary or some other text. Don't give me just summary or you won't earn any points.

Ap. 30

Tues.

Finals Week

 

Lee will have office time to meet with students--sign up for a time in advance or try to send me a message with a possible time--I'll be in CB 410d, from around 12noon to 6pm-ish.

 

Assignment Due:

  • Be sure to complete the UVLink course evaluation! You can get extra credit for doing it! Upload your receipt to Extra Credit in Canvas before the end of Dec. 13.

 

Revision of Unit 1 Narrative Literacy Essay due at end of finals week for a possible better grade! Due by 11:50pm in Canvas Assignments Unit 1 Narrative Revision. My comments are under Canvas Grades, Unit 1 Literacy Narrative Final Draft. Open this up and you will see a black thought bubble with a few comments, and also an attachment PDF with my handwritten comments.

 

May 2

Thurs.

 

Finals WeekNo more Canvas!

Assignments Due (Lee is hidden grading, so you will see numbers and some comments appear in your Canvas feed; Lee will only emerge after May 10):

  • Unit 4 Argument Essay final draft 1200-1800 words (4-6 pages: 6 is probably best; with 4-6+ good sources), MLA format, MLA in-text citations and last page Works Cited. This Classic Argument with a clear position or claim about a focused controversy from Boys in the Boat (a controversy you find by answering topic and stasis questions, and doing research for those questions, and freewriting about possible contestable points you want to make related to a controversy in the book).  A classic argument must have:
      • a clear argument position or claim/thesis (always contestable)
      • clear reasons or subclaims that lay out the areas you want to argue withing in the body of your essay
      • at least one idea from another side (you can call these rebuttals, but it is often good to try to counter the rebuttal)
      • very specific evidence explaining and supporting each reason/subclaim or rebuttal in the body paragraphs--use 4-6+ sources including Boys in the Boat.
    • You should have read ch. 11 and 17 on arguments in EA.
    • You should have read the Unit 4 Argument Assignment sheet.
    • Be sure to go over the essay a few times thinking about the Unit 4 Argument Revision Rubric (this doesn't mention editing or MLA, however, but these are also worth points).
    • You should try reading your essay out loud so you can find various common grammar errors before turning in your final draft.
  • Be sure to complete the UVLink course evaluation! You can get extra credit for doing it! Upload your receipt to Extra Credit in Canvas before the end of Dec. 13.
  • Last day to upload anything late to Canvas is Dec. 13th!
  • Be sure you check Canvas Grades and/or email over the next few weeks to see your grades, or any emergency messages I might have sent you etc.
  • Everything late from the last few weeks must be turned in to Canvas way before 11:50pm! UVU turns off your access to Canvas tonight or it won't be graded!
  • Be sure to complete the UVLink course evaluation! You can get extra credit for doing it! Upload your receipt to Extra Credit in Canvas before the end of Dec. 13.

 

Be sure to check grades in a few weeks, and email me if you see any problems so we can correct things, or discuss things.

 

 

May 8

Thurs.

 

Lee turns in grades  
 

Revise and write all summer!

 

 

Copyright Lee Ann Mortensen. Last Update: Thursday, March 14, 2019 10:43 PM

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