Some random photos.
 

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This is the highest switchback on the east side of Big Mountain Pass sometime in the spring.  Not a great shot, and in fact the road was much more picturesque a few days earlier, immediately after it was plowed.  The road over the pass is closed during the winter, and is usually available for cycling for several weeks before it is opened to automobile traffic.  It usually is opened to cars just before Memorial Day. 


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We called this yurt in the Tushar Mountains home for several days early in 2001.  Over 2 feet of snow fell while we were there, but unfortunately most of the terrain near the yurt is gently sloped and east through south through west facing.  In addition to being surprised by the disappointing aspects, we were didn't expect to be breaking trail, identifying shorter & safer travel routes, and evaluating avalanche hazards for our guide.  But the guy sure did sweat a lot, and we had fun anyways.  We were Fred and Karen Porter/Derose (our faithful trip organizers), Brain Hopkins, Ronda Reasner, Josepi 'I rule sport class' Czop, and an untalented photographer.


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The author proudly wearing the University of Utah Ph.D. robe at UVSC convocation and commencement, spring 2001.  The demon in the background clearly is in humanities and very jealous of the scientists surrounding him.


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An Alpine Start.  Looking west from the Beartrap Fork trailhead in Big Cottonwood Canyon at the alpenglow on Mt. Raymond and Gobblers Knob, early on January 19, 2002.  There was about 10" of untracked 4% density snow to be skiied.


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This is Browning Ave. the morning after a late winter storm.  This storm and others that followed immediately after triggered a dramatic avalanche cycle in the high country.